A Village Falls into the Sea

Longreads

In the middle of the map, climate change can feel like an abstraction. Is a warmer, wetter summer an anomaly in the weather pattern, or part of a greater change? Is this an early heat wave just a seasonal spike?

At the edges of the map though, the impact is very real. Solid ground is literally disappearing. At Sierra, Rachel Rivera visits Shishmaref, an island village north of Nome, Alaska, and witnesses the effect that global warming — and the resulting rising sea level — has had on this remote Native Alaskan settlement.

Long accustomed to living under the most extreme weather conditions, Inupiaq communities on Alaska’s Arctic coast are facing their toughest challenge yet. The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet. Average air temperatures are more than 6°F warmer than they were at the beginning of the 20th century, and the lack…

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Salish Raven

CTV Vancouver Island

Last Updated Wednesday, June 7, 2017 4:15PM PDT

BC Ferries’ third natural gas-powered vessel has finally arrived in Victoria, but it’s looking a little more bare than the others.

salish raven

The Salish Raven pulled into Ogden Point Wednesday after capping off a 41-day journey from Gdansk, Poland, where it was built.

The two other natural gas ferries, the Salish Orca and Salish Eagle, have already arrived sporting artwork from B.C. First Nations artists.

But the exterior of the Raven is still blank – because temperatures in Poland were below ideal for applying Musqueam Nation artist Thomas Cannell’s work, according to BC Ferries.

Now that it’s here in B.C., the artwork will be applied before the ferry goes into service on Southern Gulf Islands routes this fall.

The vessel will carry 145 vehicles and up to 600 people.

The Salish Orca already began servicing the Comox-Powell River route in mid-May, and the Salish Eagle will go to work on the Tsawassen-Southern Gulf Islands route in late June.

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BC Ferries Places Order for Two New Ferries

Canada-based ferry owner and operator BC Ferries has awarded Damen Shipyards Group of the Netherlands a contract to build two new minor class vessels.

Scheduled to go into service in 2020, the 81-metre ferries will have the capacity to carry at least 44 vehicles and up to 300 passengers and crew.

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The first of the new vessels will be deployed on the Powell River – Texada Island route, replacing the 59-year old North Island Princess, which will be retired from the BC Ferries fleet.

The second vessel will replace the Quadra Queen II on the Port McNeill – Alert Bay – Sointula route. The Quadra Queen II will become a relief vessel, allowing for fleet redeployments and the retirement of the 53-year old Howe Sound Queen.

“We are excited that this project continues our commitment to coastal communities to replace aging ships with standardized vessels, which will reduce costs and improve operations,” Mark Collins, BC Ferries’ President and CEO, said.

The ferries will feature a hybrid diesel electric – battery power generation and propulsion system, and engines which operate on ultra-low sulphur diesel fuel. They will also have a hull, propeller and thruster design that minimizes underwater radiated noise, arrangements to minimize shipboard vibration and airborne noise, as well as a fully contained waste water handling system.

Damen has entered into an agreement with Point Hope Shipyards of Victoria, B.C. to provide technical and warranty support for the new vessels, ensuring repair and maintenance activities will be performed in British Columbia.

The total project budget, which includes financing and project management costs, is around CAD 86.5 million (USD 64.3 million). The project is partially funded by the Government of Canada.

Port Everglades Prepares to Handle Bigger Ships

Florida’s Port Everglades is purchasing three low-profile Super Post Panamax container-handling gantry cranes to meet demands anticipated from the port’s expansion program.

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The Broward County Board of County Commissioners approved the USD 41.4 million crane purchase, with an option for the seaport to purchase an additional three cranes anytime within five years of placing the order for the first three cranes.

At USD 13.8 million each, the new cranes will be constructed by Shanghai Zhenhua Heavy Industries (ZPMC). The low-profile cranes will have the ability to handle containers stacked eight units high and reach across 22 containers on a ship’s decks.

Port Everglades’ existing seven gantry cranes in the Southport area are limited to containers stacked five units high and can reach out across 16 containers on a ship’s deck.

“Cargo ships are getting larger and several shipping lines already coming to Port Everglades from Europe and South America need Super Post-Panamax cranes now,” Port Everglades Chief Executive and Port Director Steve Cernak, said.